Dental Education articles list

Association between oral health literacy, gingival health and oral hygiene among dental patients

Objective: To determine the association between oral health literacy, oral hygiene and gingival health status. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among patients attending University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. Data were collected through interviewer-administered questionnaires. Index used in this study for estimating oral health literacy levels was Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry- 30 (REALD-30). The participant’s oral hygiene status was assessed using the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index while gingival health was assessed using the Gingival Index. Results: Two hundred and eight participants with 130 (62.5%) males and 78 (37.5%) females formed the population of the study and their mean age was 28.32 ± 10.5 years. The prevalence of low oral health literacy was 86 (41.3%). The oral hygiene status of most of the participants 100 (48.1) was fair. The prevalence of gingivitis was 58.2%. Oral health literacy had significant statistical negative correlation with age, oral hygiene and gingival health status. Oral health literacy consistently emerged as a predictor of oral hygiene and gingival health status. Conclusion: Majority of the participants with low oral health literacy had fair/poor oral hygiene status (p = 0.000, OR= 17.870, 95% CI = 7.320-43.627) and gingivitis (p = 0.000, OR= 7.054, 95% CI = 3.514-14.164).

Hope Inegbenosun

A comparative study of social and economic aspect of migration

India is a country of immense diversity. It is home to people of many different racial, languages, ethnic, religious, and national backgrounds. Groups of people in India differ from each other not only in physical or demographic characteristics but also in distinctive patterns of behavior and these patterns are determined by social and cultural factors like language, region, religion, and caste. Apart from behaviour, economic development, level of education and political culture of the people in various social segments differ from region to region. More you can say that economy and cultures have been enriched by the contributions of migrants from round the globe. In an increasingly globalised world, migratory movements is continuously shaping the countries all over the world. Some countries like India and Ireland, which set the example of economic development and social integration, have the positive impact of the migration by globalisation and some countries like USA, which recently witness racism, xenophobia and discrimination have the negative impact on the migrants. It does not mean India do not face fragmentation and USA do not have cohesion. USA have many stories which show successful integration process, that facilitated the lives of immigrant communities, but being a developed country it still suffers from cultural alienation. In these countries, borders are built within borders to create cultural divides that do not allow people to integrate. Recently, this problem has become more prominent due to the rise of terrorism, clash of cultures in the world, leading to the glorification of stereotypes. People are becoming less accepting towards anyone who does not belong to their region. Migration does not stop after people move from one place to another place. The main question start after that ‘now what’ they will do. That is why this topic needs to be discussed thoroughly in order to find better solutions. This paper will begin with an analysis of different approaches to Migration, discuss the target groups for integration policies, provide indicators of the current situation of migrants and proceed to an analysis of integration tools: legislation, social policies and participatory processes. It will focus not only on the impact of migration but also on social integration, mix culture like indo-western culture in a comparative basis.

Ekta Meena

A comparative study of social and economic aspect of migration

India is a country of immense diversity. It is home to people of many different racial, languages, ethnic, religious, and national backgrounds. Groups of people in India differ from each other not only in physical or demographic characteristics but also in distinctive patterns of behavior and these patterns are determined by social and cultural factors like language, region, religion, and caste. Apart from behaviour, economic development, level of education and political culture of the people in various social segments differ from region to region. More you can say that economy and cultures have been enriched by the contributions of migrants from round the globe. In an increasingly globalised world, migratory movements is continuously shaping the countries all over the world. Some countries like India and Ireland, which set the example of economic development and social integration, have the positive impact of the migration by globalisation and some countries like USA, which recently witness racism, xenophobia and discrimination have the negative impact on the migrants. It does not mean India do not face fragmentation and USA do not have cohesion. USA have many stories which show successful integration process, that facilitated the lives of immigrant communities, but being a developed country it still suffers from cultural alienation. In these countries, borders are built within borders to create cultural divides that do not allow people to integrate. Recently, this problem has become more prominent due to the rise of terrorism, clash of cultures in the world, leading to the glorification of stereotypes. People are becoming less accepting towards anyone who does not belong to their region. Migration does not stop after people move from one place to another place. The main question start after that ‘now what’ they will do. That is why this topic needs to be discussed thoroughly in order to find better solutions. This paper will begin with an analysis of different approaches to Migration, discuss the target groups for integration policies, provide indicators of the current situation of migrants and proceed to an analysis of integration tools: legislation, social policies and participatory processes. It will focus not only on the impact of migration but also on social integration, mix culture like indo-western culture in a comparative basis.

Ekta Meena

Study of temperature variation in human peripheral region during wound healing process due to plastic surgery

In this paper, investigations are made to analyze the human body temperature during wound healing process due to surgery. Wound is considered after the skin graft. Skin graft is a technique used in plastic surgery. Skin is the first line of defense between the human and environment, it is very susceptible to damage. Internal body or core temperature (Tb) is one of the clinical vital signs along with pulse and respiratory rates. Any disturbance in body temperature will drive complexities in wound healing process. These studies are important in the mechanism of establishing the limits of thermal regulation of human body during the healing process in different situations and conditions. The Finite element method is used to analyze tissues temperature for normal tissues (donor site) and abnormal tissues (tissues after surgery). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed. Numerical results are obtained using Crank Nicolson Method.

Manisha Jain

Metapuf: a challenge response pair generator

Physically unclonable function (PUF) is a hardware security module preferred for hardware feature based random number and secret key generation. Security of a cryptographic system relies on the quality of the challenge-response pair, it is necessary that the key generation mechanism must unpredictable and its response should constant under different operating condition. Metastable state in CMOS latch is undesirable since it response becomes unpredictable, this feature used in this work to generate a unique response. A feedback mechanism is developed which forces the latch into the metastable region; after metastable state, latch settle to high or state depends on circuit internal condition and noise which cannot be predicted. Obtained inter hamming variation for 8 PUF is 51% and average intra hamming distance is 99.76% with supply voltage variation and 96.22% with temperature variation.

Abhishek Kumar

Intersection of caste and gender based subjugation

One of the unique features of Indian society is prevalence of caste system which was originated thousands of years back to demarcate the people engaged in different occupation or jobs. Initially it was not much rigid but gradually people belonging to upper castes for their own selfish means to maintain their monopoly made this arrangement hereditary and started treating people of lower castes disgracefully. For preservation of this system, people started controlling their women to prevent inter-caste marriages and the concept of endogamy came up. This robbed away many types of freedom from women. For women belonging to lower castes, this situation is worse as they are doubly subjugated on the basis on caste as well as gender. Men belonging to their own caste treat them as secondary beings. This paper throws light on this intersection. How intersection of these two kinds of inequalities place them at the lowest position in Indian society. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar rises as their leader who all his life worked for empowerment of downtrodden section of society. He argues that education is the primary tool for evading these differences among people. He further emphasizes to adopt the concept of exogamy to break the backbone of Indian caste system and to immediately leave a religion or culture which legitimizes such system of inequality among people of the same land.

Swati sharma

Intersection of caste and gender based subjugation

One of the unique features of Indian society is prevalence of caste system which was originated thousands of years back to demarcate the people engaged in different occupation or jobs. Initially it was not much rigid but gradually people belonging to upper castes for their own selfish means to maintain their monopoly made this arrangement hereditary and started treating people of lower castes disgracefully. For preservation of this system, people started controlling their women to prevent inter-caste marriages and the concept of endogamy came up. This robbed away many types of freedom from women. For women belonging to lower castes, this situation is worse as they are doubly subjugated on the basis on caste as well as gender. Men belonging to their own caste treat them as secondary beings. This paper throws light on this intersection. How intersection of these two kinds of inequalities place them at the lowest position in Indian society. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar rises as their leader who all his life worked for empowerment of downtrodden section of society. He argues that education is the primary tool for evading these differences among people. He further emphasizes to adopt the concept of exogamy to break the backbone of Indian caste system and to immediately leave a religion or culture which legitimizes such system of inequality among people of the same land.

Swati sharma

Adenoid facies and its management: an orthodontic perspective

Adenoid Facies and its Management: An Orthodontic Perspective Adenoid facies is a disorder which refers to the open-mouthed face of children who have long faces with adenoid hypertrophy. Hypertrophy of the lymphoid tissues in the throat (the adenoids) is the most common cause of nasal obstruction in children. The mouth is always open because upper airway congestion/narrowing has made patients obligatory mouth breathers. Persistent mouth breathing is seen due to nasal obstruction in children and it may be associated with the development of craniofacial anomalies such as the adenoid facies (also called the “long face syndrome”). The most common symptoms are habitual mouth breathing and snoring. The most dangerous symptom is sleep apnea due to obstruction. This article discusses the orthodontic aspects of diagnosis and treatment of adenoid facies.

Kamal Singh

Globalization and chinese higher education

The cross line movement according to the two labor and products is the thing to take care of in the present worldwide economy. Worldwide exchange labor and products has for some time been a standard, for different advantages that gather from it. There have been numerous respective and multilateral arrangements comparable to cross line exchange dealings. The development of administrations area that decidedly influences the everyday daily routine and guidelines of experiencing or personal satisfaction. The World Trade Organization (WTO), of which in excess of 156 nations are individuals, has an understanding according to global administrations exchange. The General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) is the WTO's arrangement that administers exchange 12 sorts of administrations, including 'instruction administrations'. One of the basic inquiries or issues in such manner would be corresponding to the sort of college to be permitted to set up its grounds or branch or in any case offer training administrations. This paper would endeavor to give some potential experiences into this issue. Internationalization and globalization are the two Global ideas terms conversely utilized as far as higher education. Most impressively, the test to set up colleges will come from the worldwide monsters of the interchanges, data innovation and mixed media ventures worldwide suppliers, packed with capital, ready to get to remarkable global researchers and educators, talented in giving in situ understudy support at the same time in numerous nations, and equipped for expediting proficient accreditation and acknowledgment all throughout the planet. Quality in the subsequent 'worldwide virtual colleges' will be high, normalization will make cost structures that are powerfully serious, brand acknowledgment will be acquired, maybe by accepting one of the incomparable Ivy League organizations as an accomplice, or on the other hand by moving into advanced education a prevailing brand from the correspondences or processing ventures.

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

Globalization and higher education in india: the changing trends

The latest phase of capitalist expansion is called “globalisation”. That no state is an autarky but enjoys comparative advantage over others with certain resources and that free trade among these states would work for mutual benefit is the essence of it. Consequently, it advocates the minimization of the governmental intervention in economic affairs and encourages free play of market forces to foster economic development. The argument that this rationale is also applicable to higher education is increasingly gaining currency. But this paper attempts to problematise such a proposition and in contrary argues that this may prove inimical to national development. Education and especially higher education is considered to be one of the factors that help state to promoting national development. However, apologists of globalisation call for its commercialization and argue for the “withdrawal of the state” from this realm. This has only resulted in mystifying profound class inequalities within and without state. Higher education in India is not immune to this ideology in the guise of good economics. It is being structured in such a fashion since 1991 that it has been primarily coupled with the process of economic liberalization and privatization. International financial institutions like World Bank, IMF, GATT, GATS, etc are its votaries. Education was acknowledged as one of the key sectors to be traded. As a result, higher education as a “social good” is fast shifting to being a commodity in the market.

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

Indian higher education system: challenges and suggestions

Over the past 20 years, universities have been faced with sustained change, driven by external factors. This has led to the evolution of the teaching and research mission and the creation and rise of the third mission. Such mission extension has led to the emergence of entrepreneurial universities which has seen a move from traditional research and teaching business models, to business models which incorporate a much wider range of activities, to meet stakeholder demands as well as sustaining and growing universities in the era of intense national and international competition. This special issue extends knowledge by providing novel insights into the multidimensional antecedent contextual influences, consequences and implications of university mission expansion. We also provide a foundational research agenda which will help guide future research exploring the changing and expanding university missions and business models. Higher education system plays an important role for the country’s overall development which includes industrial, social, economic etc. Indian higher education system is third largest in the world. The role of Indian higher educational institutes such as colleges and universities in the present time is to provide quality based education in the field of education, research etc to empower youth for self sustainability. This paper includes the key challenges that India is currently facing in higher education and also includes some initiatives taken by the government to meet those challenges.

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

New dimension in higher education in india

Higher Education has an important role in the task of rebuilding a nation and it pavCes the way for overall development of a nation. The twentieth century has witnessed several revolutions like Green revolution, White revolution, I.T revolution, so on and so forth, taking human civilization to new heights. At the start of 21st century, we gave a lot of importance given to higher education. Every country realized the value of higher education and the benefits that accrue from it. “The social demands for higher education continue to increase. The inabilities of the state to support this growing demand result in new financing arrangements for higher education. The recent reforms in this area could be broadly divided into two categories: the privatization of public institutions and the establishment of private institutions of higher education. Privatization implies the application of market principles in the operation of public institutions, while ownership rests within the public domain. Promotion of the private sector implies the growth and expansion of the non-state sector in higher education, and very often this sector does not rely on state funding for its growth and expansion. Both of these measures have paved the way for market operations in higher education

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

A chronicle of indian higher education: past, present, and future

Higher Education has an important role in the task of rebuilding a nation and it paves the way for overall development of a nation. The twentieth century has witnessed several revolutions like Green revolution, White revolution, I.T revolution etc; transforming human civilization in to new heights. At the start of 21st century, there is a lot of importance given to higher education. Every country realizes the value of higher education and the benefits accrue from it. There is a greater importance attached to higher education. “The social demands for higher education continue to increase. Indian higher education has a rich and complex history that spans millennia. This abstract provides an overview of the key developments in Indian higher education, highlighting its evolution from ancient times to the modern era. The history of Indian higher education is marked by the establishment of ancient centers of learning, the influence of various empires and dynasties, colonialism, and post-independence reforms. This abstract also touches upon the challenges and opportunities that have shaped the landscape of higher education in India.The history of Indian higher education can be divided into several distinct periods. In ancient India, centers of learning such as Takshashila and Nalanda emerged as renowned seats of knowledge, attracting students and scholars from across the world. These institutions laid the foundation for a tradition of rigorous intellectual inquiry

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

Educational access for tribal groups in telangana state

A state in southern India called Telangana has a rich and varied cultural history. There are numerous tribes in the area, and they have long coexisted peacefully with the environment. These tribes have distinctive traditions that have been handed down through the generations. The Gond, Koya, Lambada, and Banjara are notable tribes in Telangana. Over the years, these tribes have encountered several difficulties, such as land acquisition, displacement, and a loss of cultural identity. However, via several government initiatives and community-based programs, efforts are being undertaken to maintain their culture and give them more authority. Tribal Development has been in the agenda for discussion at several levels in different forums for quite some time and continues to be an important aspect for serious deliberation in Telangana, not only because of a significant portion of the tribal population but more importantly because of the inequality of their participation, both socially and economically. The conventional wisdom that the tribal population should not be integrated with the mainline population, does not cut ice any longer as tribals themselves are eager to participate in national development and construction. A major initiative to empower the tribals, in my view is through the provision of appropriate educational opportunities to the children of the tribal families, though the aspects like infrastructural and health are identified as critical inputs. The present book tries to disclose the situation of the Scheduled Tribes in Telangana State. Various eminent scholars and students, media friends delivered their observations through their research papers. As per the observations and findings, the book contains some valuable and instant suggestions for overall development of tribes that the Telangana State Government has to play a major role in this endeavour This article critically examines initiatives for greater participation in education by tribal communities in India, arguing that current policy does not effectively enough facilitate greater participation and may, in fact, go against the avowed principle of ensuring greater equity. The article relies on fieldwork-based study to support arguments for the need to be culturally sensitive in making appropriate provisions for the education of scheduled tribes in India. Reasons for high dropout rates and non-enrolment among tribal children are examined and some searching

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

Expanding horizons: how foreign direct investment shapes higher education worldwide

In today's globalized world, the role of foreign direct investment (FDI) in shaping higher education cannot be overstated. This paper explores the multifaceted impact of FDI on higher education institutions worldwide, delving into its influence on academic programs, research endeavors, institutional infrastructure, and student experiences. Drawing upon a comprehensive review of scholarly literature, policy documents, and case studies, this paper elucidates the ways in which FDI contributes to the expansion and transformation of higher education systems across the globe. The analysis begins by examining the motivations driving foreign investors to engage with higher education, including economic imperatives, strategic partnerships, and knowledge transfer objectives. It then explores the diverse forms that FDI takes in the higher education sector, ranging from institutional partnerships and joint ventures to the establishment of branch campuses and research collaborations. By analyzing specific examples from different regions, this paper illustrates how FDI shapes the academic landscape, fosters innovation, and enhances internationalization efforts within higher education institutions.

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

Fdi in indian higher education

The decision of the government of India to allow foreign direct investment in higher education is based on a consultation paper prepared by the commerce ministry, which is marked by arguments, perverse logic and forced conclusions. FDI in any field does not have an attached objective of fulfilling social agenda of the welfare state. It is guided by profit and market. This would result in commoditization of education. As per past most foreign institutes invest in technical courses which market needs rather than in quality education and research which is important for creating and developing human resource. There is a shortage of funds in higher education sector. Here are not many ways in which this investment in this sector can be increased in this sector domestically. Since a large number of students go abroad for their higher education, it is sensible to allow foreign universities to set up their campuses here, in India. This would help in arresting the outflow of monetary and human capital. Further, foreign higher educational institutes would create competition with the local institutes making them internationally competitive this article examines the issues and financial compulsions, presented in the consultation paper

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

New dimension in higher education in india

Higher Education has an important role in the task of rebuilding a nation and it pavCes the way for overall development of a nation. The twentieth century has witnessed several revolutions like Green revolution, White revolution, I.T revolution, so on and so forth, taking human civilization to new heights. At the start of 21st century, we gave a lot of importance given to higher education. Every country realized the value of higher education and the benefits that accrue from it. “The social demands for higher education continue to increase. The inabilities of the state to support this growing demand result in new financing arrangements for higher education. The recent reforms in this area could be broadly divided into two categories: the privatization of public institutions and the establishment of private institutions of higher education. Privatization implies the application of market principles in the operation of public institutions, while ownership rests within the public domain. Promotion of the private sector implies the growth and expansion of the non-state sector in higher education, and very often this sector does not rely on state funding for its growth and expansion. Both of these measures have paved the way for market operations in higher education

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

Role of technology in shaping the higher education in future

In recent years, the educational landscape has changed drastically with increased connectivity and technology that promotes outside-the-box thinking and innovation. Classrooms at all levels are evolving to meet this "new normal" through virtual lessons, smart technology in schools and online access for students and parents an individual possession of knowledge, skills and experience through education certainly transforms the nature’s endowed resources as marketable products/services with ‘economic value’ is termed as human capital and knowledge economy. Enhance and enrich of human capital fillips nation’s sound and health economy is the rationale of education. Education thrives to (a) educate, enlighten and encourage teaching, (b) input of understanding and (c) spirit and urge true facts. Education policy needs a clear-cut and transparency to lead in commercialisation and determination of values and proactive to the market logic. The great challenges accompany have been thoroughly exposed in recent periods through Covid-19 crisis. Interaction and integration with the economy of the rest of Worlds Counties, has now become a new emerging facet to bring out a unifying roof of the whole-teaching contents and methodology to attain the socio-economic development. To become a world-class academic institute heavily depends upon the committed faculty, quality infrastructures, supportive administration, and learning environment. Last but not least is the hardworking and brilliance or vividness is the foremost factor of promising among the young students. The corporate philanthropy to higher education is the call of the day to ensure trueness of education system for urging the prime goal of socio-economic development. This study focuses on the emerging trends in Indian higher education.

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

The g-20 declaration: the new delhi declaration

The Delhi Declaration of G20 begins by stating that this is a “defining moment in history” and that G20’s decisions today will affect the future of the people and planet. Don’t dismiss this as typical diplomatic hyperbole, for this recognition of the importance of the moment, and the implications for the long-term, is central to understanding India’s historic Before it gets into the substantive elements across domains, the text, agreed upon in entirety by all 20 members, outlines the political, economic and environmental challenges that have engulfed the world. In a clear sign of India’s role in ensuring that the interests of both the global South, which constitute the marginalised within the international order, and the poor and vulnerable who constitute the marginalised within both rich and poor countries, is addressed, the text also lays out clear principles and priorities. The Indian presidency has made it clear that there will be no compromise between fighting poverty and fighting the climate crisis. And themes such as ensuring growth, getting sustainable development goals (SDGs) back on track, battling the climate crisis, preparing for health emergencies, reforming multilateral development banks (MDBs), dealing with the debt crisis, spreading digital public infrastructure (DPI), generating jobs, bridging the gender gap, and giving a voice to the global south dominate the letter and spirit of the document.

Dr Gedam Kamalakar

Academic leadership and governance of higher education

This abstract provides an overview of the critical role of academic leadership and governance in higher education institutions. As the landscape of higher education undergoes profound transformations, academic leaders and governance structures play a pivotal role in shaping the direction, quality, and effectiveness of educational institutions. This abstract highlights key themes, challenges, and considerations related to academic leadership and governance, emphasizing the need for adaptability, transparency, and inclusivity in the decision-making processes. The abstract begins by acknowledging the evolving nature of higher education and the increasing complexity of issues facing institutions, including technological advancements, changing student demographics, and shifting funding models. It underscores the central importance of academic leadership and governance in addressing these challenges and promoting institutional excellence.

Dr Gedam Kamalakar